Crystal Geyser on the Green River...

is an unusual and rare CO2-driven cold water geyser that is depositing a colorful mound of travertine. Furthermore, it’s the result of an improperly abandoned oil/gas exploration well immediately south of Green River, Utah, and it periodically erupts on 8 and 22 hour-long cycles that are poorly understood.

An older, innactive but natural travertine and barite mound, originally described by John Wesley Powell on his explorations in 1869: “W e stop to examine some interesting rocks, deposited by mineral springs that at one time must have existed here, but which are no longer flowing...  “

An older, innactive but natural travertine and barite mound, originally described by John Wesley Powell on his explorations in 1869: “We stop to examine some interesting rocks, deposited by mineral springs that at one time must have existed here, but which are no longer flowing...

Mini-rimstone dams on the steeper portions of the travertine mound.

Mini-rimstone dams on the steeper portions of the travertine mound.

The most active portion of the travertine mound.

The most active portion of the travertine mound.

Here’s an interesting technical reference about this unusual feature: http://www.llnl.gov/tid/lof/documents/pdf/334382.pdf

Now three in the heronry...

The two in the upper right are definitely a nesting pair based on their behavior. It’s been enjoyable to have this opportunity to watch the gathering of these interesting birds.

The two in the upper right are definitely a nesting pair based on their behavior. It’s been enjoyable to have this opportunity to watch the gathering of these interesting birds.

The male hopped over to an adjacent nest, picked around a bit, and plucked a selection and returned to the other nest.

The male hopped over to an adjacent nest, picked around a bit, and plucked a selection and returned to the other nest.

The twig is delivered to the nest that the female has clearly preferred. This suggests that the last mating pair to arrive inherits the last ratty nest in the heronry.

The twig is delivered to the nest that the female has clearly preferred. This suggests that the last mating pair to arrive inherits the last ratty nest in the heronry.

Early morning at the heron rookery...

that is technically termed a “heronry.” Early morning is the best time to catch waking activity in the roost, now occupied by two. (Click on any of the smaller images to enlarge.)

Orion hanging above Professor Valley...

towards the west, as I waited patiently to photograph the Milky Way at Fisher Towers several nights ago. I’ve annotated several celestial objects in the image, and the dim orange glow in the bottom center is the Red Cliffs Lodge on the Colorado River.

This is a 20 sec exposure, hence the airplane trails in the image.

This is a 20 sec exposure, hence the airplane trails in the image.

Milky Way over Fisher Towers...

taken around 4 am this morning. The bright glob in the upper part of the galactic core is the planet Jupiter, overexposed due to its brightness.

Recipe: Tripod-mounted Canon 6D with 14mm Rokinon manual lens, 20 sec, f/2.8 at ISO 3200.

Recipe: Tripod-mounted Canon 6D with 14mm Rokinon manual lens, 20 sec, f/2.8 at ISO 3200.

PlanIt! Pro is an Android astroimaging planning app and is key to staging images like that seen above, allowing the user to locate themselves via GPS in order capture your envisioned landscape composition involving various celestial objects and/or events. Brilliant.

Fence-jumping mule deer visitor...